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Faculty and Staff Resources

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CRLT provides helpful resources

To provide strategies for anticipating and responding to difficult discussions as well as classroom conflict and disruption and helpful guidelines for classroom interactions.

IGR Insight Handouts

IGR Insight Handouts offer invaluable print ready handouts and resources for those considering applying dialogic techniques in the classroom and beyond.

Faculty & Staff Resources for this Election Season and Beyond

Curated resources for faculty and staff to encourage voter engagement, and also to support the development of students’ civic engagement and habits of democracy before and after the upcoming election.

Preparing to Teach About the 2020 Election (and After)

The first of a three-part series by CRLT and the Ginsberg Center outlining strategies and resources that instructors can use to plan, frame, and facilitate conversations about the 2020 Election.

Structuring Classroom Discussions about the 2020 Election

The second of a three-part series by CRLT and the Ginsberg Center outlining strategies and resources that instructors can use to plan, frame, and facilitate conversations about the 2020 Election.

After Election 2020: Moving from Reaction to Action

This is the third of a three-part series by CRLT and the Ginsberg Center outlining strategies and resources that instructors can use to plan, frame, and facilitate conversations about the 2020 Election.

Leading the Classroom in Tumultuous Times: A Video Resource for Instructors

Answers to questions with which U-M instructors have been grappling this fall as they teach in the midst of the upcoming U.S. Presidential election, the ongoing impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, the labor movements on campus, and the continued activism and protests against racism and police violence. A recent conversation between Dr. Angela Dillard, Richard A. Meisler Collegiate Professor of Afroamerican & African Studies, and U-M Associate General Counsel Jack Bernard offer an excellent resource for instructors on how to navigate their approach to these issues.

Here is a quick reference list put together by the Ford School, including timestamps, of where some of the key questions relevant to instructors this fall are addressed in the video:

  • Top 3 things to know about university policy when teaching political topics (timestamp: 21:05)
  • What makes the diag different from the classroom in terms of free speech? (timestamp: 37:54)
  • What would make teaching in this moment exciting? (timestamp: 1:10:55)
  • How might I handle the lack of agreement on evidence in the course? (timestamp: 1:19:00)
  • Can I advocate for students to vote (Big 10 Voting Challenge)? (timestamp: 1:24:40)